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20121031
20121031
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
by religion? >> i am episcapalian. my husband is a cathlic, my children are catholics. we raise our children as catholics. i am happy to talk about my view on abortion. it is that it should be safe, legal, and rare. i've worked hard on the rare part, because i wanted to make sure this is not just something that divides us politically, and that i would work to make sure we reduce the number of unintended pregnancies and helped unemployed men and women get a job. i work with an organization that does research and now has the beginning evidence to show that we have reduced the number of abortions in iowa by 26% and unintended pregnancies by 8%. i have been in washington talking about the results of this and we hope that this will be a model for the nation. we won't have to talk about abortion if we make sure that people have access to contraceptives. i would like congressman king to explain what his view is on that. he has said that -- i would like to know if he believes that women in this community have the right to -- the legal right to go into the drugstore with a prescription for birth cont
parking meter thing, you know what? religion aside, least one day of the week it would be nice if san francisco city government was off the backs of everyday residents. [ applause ] >> i like that. thank you. >> all right. next question. san francisco's transportation inserve drivers, bicyclists and transit uses. bicyclists are not charged for the privilege of using or parking on public roadways. mr. davis, mr. everett and miss selby should the city assess fees on bicycle owners to pay for transportation improvements? >> i don't think so and i will tell you why because the city is moving in a direction that i think they should be which is encouraging more people to get out of their cars and to get onto bikes and to use our streets and walk the streets. you know, i think we need to be visionary about getting and meeting our goals. we have a goal of 20% of all trips in san francisco being taken on a bike by 2020. the bike coalition, which is one of my endorsements, as well district 5 group have been advocating for this connecting the city plan, the bike coalition for cross town bikew
port authority police, my fire department. nobody stops and asks you what your religion is, nobody stops and asks you what your political party affiliation is. folks are just rolling up their sleeves, getting to work. so what you're seeing in the field, what you're seeing with residents, with emergency responders, is what we should be seeing with all our elected leaders as well. the president of the united states, our governor and really, dozens of local elected leaders of all parties across the state, we're all pulling together. we're all in the same foxhole, all fighting the same enemy here. it's not refreshing, frankly, that's the standard that built america in the past and will help us forge forward in the future. >> we're hearing that there have been as many as six fatalities now in new jersey. that death toll may well rise. there are many areas people can't get to. what are you hearing about people who may be trapped or areas where these services have simply not been able to get to them? >> that's the crisis. that's what has me concerned. the storm may have passed but the cha
to their guns and religion, the kind of white working-class workers that the president is having the most trouble connecting with. the obama campaign is advertising as well. they have a turnout machine in philadelphia. pacs don't want the obama campaign to gin up their turnout machine. i think that machine will start to get engaged and that machine will drive president obama's margin down there. that's in southeastern pennsylvania. host: we're talking about an october surprise in campaign 2012 and the history of it. this on twitter -- guest: she's probably right. many people aboard a voted. there is 1 weeks ago. the average american is paying attention to something other than politics, whether it's their own economic situation or recovering from storm damage in a swing state like virginia or new hampshire. -- many people have voted already. ballistics of trying to get around the place after a storm can be a real problem -- the logistics. it's not like either of these guys will have a game changer. the next couple days will be focused on not doing something stupid around the hurricane and
interference, without pressure, without political interference. that's their role in that religion. in iran, they see a challenge to the legitimacy of the oversight of that. it's a governance issue. it's not a sunni shia issue. and with iran's government, d.c. essentially death by 1000 razor cuts as iran has a coherent strategy for destabilization in the region, starting in baghdad, extends to damascus. hamas, muslim brotherhood and yemen, bahrain, the eastern province, wherever they can take an issue and turn it into a sectarian issue, that is the strategy that they see that iran is pursuing. so he ran as a very real threat to them. it's the existential threat in the region. >> thank you, mr. ambassador for enlightening us in this opening session of the second day of his 21st annual comp trends of u.s. policy issues. [applause] >> next we have a relative newcomer to the annual forums in the sands of the new league of arab states chief representative ambassador to the united states. i've known each one of them for the last almost half-century and each one of them brings to the cars in the t
a question. as a catholic, how has your view on abortion been shaped by your religion? >> i am not catholic. i am an episcopalian. i cannot answer that question. my husband is a catholic. my children are catholic. my grandchildren have just been baptized in a catholic church. we raise our children as catholics. i would be happy to talk about my view on abortion. my view on abortion is that it should be safe, legal, and rare. >> here is a point that is constructive and a difference between us. we have babies and america and in iowa that are being avoided simply because they are baby girls, because the mother wants a baby boy instead of a baby girl. we have evidence. we have legislation before congress that prohibits sex- selective abortions. i think it matters. it matters to the little girls who are being aborted. >> election day is one week away. find a key house senate races across the country on c-span, c- span radio, and c-span.org. >> now, a look at color model as a battleground state in the 2012 election. an update on the presidential race in that state. this is 25 minutes. host: all t
for it. why should i pay for their birth control? it is against my faith. i have the freedom of religion and plan to exercise that by voting for romney. host: kathy sullivan. guest: in the first place, no one is proposing that taxpayers pay for someone's birth control. the issue is whether or not the employer has the right to discriminate against certain types of prescriptions, specifically birth control. this is a law we have had in new hampshire for several years now that employers have to cover prescription contraceptive. it has worked quite well. it has nothing to do with the tax payer. it is the expense of the employer, not the taxpayer. with respect to the health-care issue, i have to tell you something, i am the managing partner of a law firm. we have about 50 people who work there. up until couple of years ago, our health and -- health insurance premiums went up by double-digit numbers. for years. last year our health care premiums will have gone up by only 3% total for two years, which is unheard of several years ago. we kept looking at the double- digit percentage increases. i
for their birth control? it is against my faith. i have the freedom of religion and plan to exercise that by voting for romney. host: kathy sullivan. guest: in the first place, no one is proposing that taxpayers pay for someone's birth control. the issue is whether or not the employer has the right to discriminate against certain types of prescriptions, specifically birth control. this is a law we have had in new hampshire for several years now that employers have to cover prescription contraceptive. it has worked quite well. it has nothing to do with the tax payer. it is the expense of the employer, not the taxpayer. with respect to the health-care issue, i have to tell you something, i am the managing partner of a law firm. we have about 50 people who work there. up until couple of years ago, our health and -- health insurance premiums went up by double-digit numbers. for years. last year our health care premiums will have gone up by only 3% total for two years, which is unheard of several years ago. we kept looking at the double- digit percentage increases. i am very happy with wh
that i thought was guaranteed under the constitution, the practice of your religion, that now there has to be an amendment put forward to bring that about. if the law was never passed, the lawsuit wouldn't be in place, and religious freedom, today, would not be in question. >> moderator: continuing with rebuttals, mr. horning, 30 seconds. horning: there's a lot of misunderstanding, and there's no real winning the issue. unfortunately, it's one of those that, you know, it's an outcome of something terrible happening sometimes, and it's dealing with life situation nobody wants. we can't do justice to it. as a federal legislature, i can't do justice to it. i would fail in what i would try to achieve. >> moderator: thank you. mr. donnelly? donnelly: my faith guided me on the issue, and i know their faiths have guided my friends who are up here as well. we have a program in my town called the women's care center. what they do is provide a positiontive alternative. for women who are pregnant, there's an opportunity for a place to live, a place to be cared for, and for somebody to know there's
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)